Condoms: Popular Myths Debunked

Over the years the condom has garnered a magnitude of myths to surround them. While many of the more elaborate ones are taken with a pinch of salt by most, there still exist “facts” that people take to heart and live by. The problem here is that owing to this mythos, people are still rejecting a highly effective contraceptive device. Durexcondoms.net, has decided to take a closer look and debunk some of the more popular and bizarre fiction pertaining to the modern condom.

Myth #1: It’s Safer to use Two Condoms at Once

Known on the street as “double-bagging”, the wearing of two condoms is still rumored to be an “extra safe” practice. The truth is exactly the opposite. On the contrary, wearing two condoms is far less safe than wearing only one. “Double-bagging” causes friction between the two condoms. As the heat of the moment draws nearer, one or both condoms will tear as a result. By wearing two condoms, you’re also increasing the chance of one coming off.

condoms

Myth #2: People with Latex Allergies can’t use a Condom

Yes, another myth. While latex allergies are real, many brands stock non-latex condoms. These are usually made from a synthetic rubber called Polyurethane but can also be made from other rubber-based materials such as Polyisoprene. This poses the question: if someone knows they have a latex allergy, why don’t they have these to-hand?

Myth #3: Condoms Make Sex Bad

Many people follow the misconception that wearing a condom desensitizes the sensation. This may have been true many moons ago in the early days of condoms, not so much now. Condoms come in all shapes and sizes. Not only can you buy ultra-thin condoms to increase the natural feeling, but you can also buy ribbed condoms along with many other textures for both him and her. Furthermore, condom-safe lubrications can be purchased to add to the experience.

condoms means bad sex

Myth #4: Condoms Sometimes come with Holes

Due to their importance, condoms are strictly regulated by the FDA (Food and Drug Agency, US) and are consequently subject to scrutinizing testing and quality control before being made available to the general public. Only condoms that adhere to the strict national standards pass these tests. Rigorous product testing is also commonplace, although I’m guessing that this is done using machines rather than actual sex.

Myth #5: Condoms don’t Protect Against STIs

This is entirely untrue. The condom is the safest way to stop the transmission of STIs during sexual intercourse. STIs (Sexually Transmitted Infections) are passed on by genital secretions while having sex. By having a barrier in place, the likelihood of you catching an STI with a condom on is very low. However, you should always be aware, if the condom should tear or rip during sex, STIs can still be passed on from one person to another.

 

Myth #6: Only Men can Wear a Condom

While this is true, to an extent, you can buy a female form of condom called the femidom. These can be inserted a couple of hours before intercourse (eww) and are, apparently, really comfortable for both parties.

female condoms

Afterword

So, there we have it; six myths about the condom busted. However, there are plenty more out there. Just use your common sense when using a condom and, more importantly, research anything you feel may be untrue. The chances are that you’re probably right.